2016-07-29

"The Second Book" available in electronic formats




My most recent literary novel, The Second Book, is now available in several electronic formats:
Don't ask me why Apple charges more than the price I set. They seem to do this with all my books.

Most of the above links also allow you to read a sample, typically 10 to 15 percent of the book.

You can, of course, still purchase a print version of the book.

2016-05-07

New augmented logs for CQ WW from 2005 to 2015

I have added two more columns to the flags on each line of the CQ WW augmented logs (the MD5 hash of the file is: 6e8d27f709f13b1851e3bb134592d336).

 The additions to the standard CQ WW Cabrillo QSO line are now (changes in bold):
  1. The letter "A" or "U" indicating "assisted" or "unassisted"
  2. A four-digit number representing the time if the contact in minutes measured from the start of the contest. (I realise that this can be calculated from the other information on the line, but it saves a lot of time to have the number readily available in the file without having to calculate it each time.)
  3. Band
  4. A set of ten flags, each encoded as T/F: 
    • a. QSO is confirmed by a log from the second party 
    • b. QSO is a reverse bust (i.e., the second party appears to have bust the call of the first party) 
    • c. QSO is an ordinary bust (i.e., the first party appears to have bust the call of the second party) 
    • d. the call of the second party is unique 
    • e. QSO appears to be a NIL 
    • f. QSO is with a station that did not send in a log, but who did make 20 or more QSOs in the contest 
    • g. QSO appears to be a country mult 
    • h. QSO appears to be a zone mult 
    • i. the QSO is a zone bust (i.e., the received zone appears to be a bust)
    • j. the QSO is a reverse zone bust (i.e. the second party appears to have bust the zone of the first party)
Note that the encoding of some of the flags requires subjective decisions to be made as to whether the flag should be true or false; consequently, and because CQ has yet to understand the importance of making their scoring code public, the value of a flag for a specific QSO line in some circumstances might not match the value that CQ would assign. (Also, CQ has more data available in the form of check logs, which are not made public.)

2016-04-17

Using Adrive with rsync and SSH keys

Jump directly to solution (lower on this page).

 

My experience setting up an Adrive account to use rsync with SSH keys 


When copy.com announced that they would no longer offer a hosting service that would allow me to make large files publicly available, I looked around for other choices. Eventually, I chose Adrive, partly because they had a good price for the amount of storage I am likely to need for this purpose, and partly because they claim that one can use their storage using ssh-based tools (in particular, rsync), which would make management easy. (I note in passing that for online storage and management of private information, I use and recommend rsync.net.)

On the Adrive login page, it says:
SCP, SFTP and Rsync
Access all your files from anywhere using SCP, SFTP and Rsync including server-side SSH key management.
which certainly sounds promising.

The instructions for using rsync are simple:
  rsync files_to_upload username@rsync.adrive.com:. 
Wonderful, except that that doesn't work. Worse, any attempt to use rsync causes a request for a password to be displayed, despite the site's mention of support for "server-side SSH key management". I tried to deal with the ssh problem first.

They provide apparently detailed instructions as to how to generate a key for use with Adrive and how to upload the key so that it will be used.

The trouble is, the instructions don't result in keys that are used; trying to use rsync still prompts the user for the password.

Having discovered all this, I entered the world of Adrive non-support. The support page tells Premium users:
Please browse through our FAQ to see if your question or problem has already been addressed. 
Well, it didn't take more than a few moments to see that any question of a technical nature is noticeably absent from the FAQ.

The support page continues:
Search the ADrive Forum to find answers within our community, or to post a new question, technical support issue, or concern.
It turns out that there is a forum dedicated to SCP, SFTP and Rsync issues. Of course, actually posting to the forum, even though one is a Premium customer with an Adrive username and password, is, as one is beginning to expect with this company, not as simple as it should be: one has to register anew to obtain permission to post to the form.

Having accomplished reregistration, I posted my ssh question, and waited for a response. And waited. And waited. After three weeks without any reply, I decided that enough was enough, and it was time to file an official support ticket. I did this via the Adrive web form.

Very soon, I received an acknowledgement via e-mail:
Thank you for submitting your support issue to ADrive. Our Support Team has received your submission. We are reviewing your question and will work to resolve it as soon as possible. If you have not already done so, please browse through our FAQ <http://www.adrive.com/info/faq> and our Forum <http://www.adrive.com/forum> to see if your question or issue has already been addressed.
Unfortunately, I received no actual useful response in the days that followed.

After a few days,. I tried again, resubmitting the issue. I received the same acknowledgement, and, as before, no reponse that actually addressed the issue.

I then tried directly e-mailing support@adrive.com. That produced no response at all.

At that point, I finally was forced to the conclusion that Adrive "support" does not actually exist in any meaningful manner, even for paying customers. The claims of support on the web site, are, it seems from my experience, intended to make the unwary believe that there is a professional support team available, when it appears that in fact any message sent to Adrive support merely ends up in /dev/null.

So at that point I decided to spend the time to resolve the issue myself (although, of course, a genuine support team could have given me the solution more or less instantly).


Forcing Adrive to use an SSH key


The solution, or at least the solution that worked here, isn't hard, but it is rather obscure.

After creating a key pair and uploading the public key, create a file called ~/.ssh/config, and insert the following lines:

  Host rsync.adrive.com
    IdentityFile <path to key>


That should force rsync to use the correct key.

The correct form of the rsync command 


There remained two problems on my system: firstly, every time I tried to use rsync, I would receive the message:
X11 forwarding request failed on channel 0
and, secondly, the command
  rsync files_to_upload username@rsync.adrive.com:.
didn't actually transfer anything (hardly surprising, since files_to_upload can't possibly mean what it says).

These problems can both be solved by using the following form of the rsync command:
rsync -rvt --delete -e "ssh -x" <directory-to-upload>/ "username@rsync.adrive.com:."
where username is replaced with your Adrive username, including the commat symbol. The ssh -x portion removes the error message about X11. The rest of the command causes rsync recursively to transfer the files in <directory-to-upload> to Adrive. The --delete option causes files that have been removed locally also to be removed on Adrive. (Using -rqt instead of -rvt will cause rsync to operate silently, which may be more useful than -rqt when the command is used in scripts).
 






2016-03-18

Most-Logged Stations in CQ WW SSB

As I mentioned in my last post, I thought that it might be interesting to use the public CQ WW logs to see which calls are logged most often in CQ WW, and how that changes from year to year. In this post I'll tabulate the SSB results.

As before, the first column is the callsign. The second column is the total number of times that the call appears in logs. That is, if a station worked HC8N on six bands, that will increment the value in the second column of the HC8N row by six. The third column is the percentage of logs that contain the callsign at least once.

CQ WW 2005:

Callsign Appearances % logs
CT3YA 6510 73
LZ9W 5616 66
V26B 5601 61
6Y2Z 5481 57
DF0CG 5359 65
RW2F 5259 63
OT5A 5251 65
MD4K 5007 60
9A7A 4999 62
DQ0Q 4994 62


CQ WW 2006:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 6414 71
DF0HQ 5905 67
MD4K 5707 60
CT3YA 5676 66
OT6A 5548 64
V26B 5539 59
EA8AH 5515 65
3V6T 5397 61
9A7A 5356 63
CT9L 5287 63


CQ WW 2007:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 6813 66
AO8A 6582 65
DF0HQ 6488 63
V26B 6426 57
CQ9K 6325 65
TS6A 6257 60
OT5A 6020 61
HC8N 5917 55
C50C 5866 57
LZ9W 5851 59


CQ WW 2008:

Callsign Appearances % logs
AO8A 6008 63
DF0HQ 5722 62
OT5A 5357 60
LZ9W 5205 57
P33W 4940 56
D4C 4898 54
CT9L 4714 54
6Y1V 4692 48
IR4X 4631 55
CN3A 4513 54


CQ WW 2009:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 7995 68
DF0HQ 7402 63
9A1P 7324 64
LZ9W 7089 60
YT9X 6976 61
AO8A 6769 60
OT5A 6361 59
OH0Z 6334 56
OL7R 6226 58
EE2W 6039 59


CQ WW 2010:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 7986 66
CR3A 7893 62
EF8R 7875 62
CN3A 7778 63
DF0HQ 7158 60
LZ9W 7036 59
A73A 6690 53
CR2X 6120 53
PJ2T 5973 45
OT5A 5894 55


CQ WW 2011:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 10118 66
C5A 9450 65
9A1P 9314 61
C37N 8705 56
CR3L 8323 59
OT5A 8211 58
LZ9W 8156 56
K3LR 8040 55
A73A 7487 53
DF0HQ 7291 52


CQ WW 2012:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DR1A 10734 65
HK1NA 10171 62
C5A 10060 63
LZ9W 9798 60
9A1A 9779 61
DF0HQ 9328 59
OT5A 9279 58
CN3A 9029 60
V26B 8704 55
PJ4X 8703 56


CQ WW 2013:

Callsign Appearances % logs
ES9C 12863 70
D4C 12274 69
DR1A 11230 66
HK1NA 10631 61
II9P 10559 63
IG9Y 9991 59
PJ2T 9896 59
K3LR 9452 57
LZ9W 9445 57
CN3A 9142 60


CQ WW 2014:

Callsign Appearances % logs
II9P 11128 66
HK1NA 10676 62
LZ9W 10366 60
CN3A 9526 62
DF0HQ 9393 57
CN2AA 8648 58
OT5A 8607 55
K3LR 8409 54
P33W 8250 55
P40L 8246 54


CQ WW 2015:

Callsign Appearances % logs
CN2AA 15100 78
CN2R 10017 63
9A1A 9872 61
CN3A 9693 61
DF0HQ 9237 59
LZ9W 9045 56
HK1NA 8936 54
PJ2T 8456 51
K3LR 8310 54
EF8R 8254 57


We can also look at ten-year spans:

CQ WW 2005 to 2014:

Callsign Appearances % logs
LZ9W 68565 55
DF0HQ 66790 55
DR1A 65618 52
OT5A 64050 54
K3LR 61458 52
CN3A 59763 53
PJ2T 59700 47
LY7A 56378 50
V26B 54656 46
P33W 50855 45


CQ WW 2006 to 2015:

Callsign Appearances % logs
DF0HQ 76024 59
LZ9W 71994 54
CN3A 69456 58
OT5A 66397 53
K3LR 65974 52
DR1A 65622 49
PJ2T 63768 47
LY7A 58901 49
P33W 58520 49
V26B 56197 45


2016-03-15

Most-Logged Stations in CQ WW CW

I thought that it might be interesting to use the public CQ WW logs to see which calls are logged most often in CQ WW, and how that changes from year to year.

Looking at CW first (SSB will be a separate post):

CQ WW 2005:

Callsign Appearances % logs
HC8N 7302 73
PJ2T 6405 66
LZ9W 6329 75
IH9P 5881 69
TZ5A 5378 67
RW2F 5293 69
DQ0Q 5169 69
DF0CG 5106 66
EA6IB 5074 66
UU7J 5062 65

The first column is the callsign. The second column is the total number of times that the call appears in logs. That is, if a station worked HC8N on six bands, that will increment the value in the second column of the HC8N row by six. The third column is the percentage of logs that contain the callsign at least once.

CQ WW 2006:

Callsign Appearances % logs
HC8N 8170 73
IH9P 8167 75
5A7A 7715 74
EA8EW 7405 64
TZ5A 7111 70
Z38N 7105 73
CT9L 6753 73
EA6IB 6590 70
DF0HQ 6311 70
DR1A 6160 69


CQ WW 2007:

Callsign Appearances % logs
LZ9W 7797 73
EF8M 7443 72
3X5A 7395 66
EA6IB 6721 68
HC8N 6705 60
D4C 6522 63
HI3A 6274 58
PJ4A 6181 62
DF0HQ 6172 65
P3F 6138 64


CQ WW 2008:

Callsign Appearances % logs
D4C 7710 71
HC8N 7515 64
CT9L 7193 71
3X5A 6870 63
LZ9W 6691 70
DF0HQ 6351 67
EE2W 6160 54
KP2M 6009 58
P3F 5982 64
PJ2T 5888 57


CQ WW 2009:

Callsign Appearances % logs
HC8GR 8066 61
LX7I 7693 68
DR1A 7300 67
CR3L 7208 67
EE2W 6917 64
LZ9W 6776 64
DF0HQ 6736 63
6Y1V 6408 56
EA8URL 6268 60
UU7J 6119 58


CQ WW 2010:

Callsign Appearances % logs
C5A 9102 68
EA2EA 8940 71
LZ9W 8790 70
9A1A 8286 69
CR3L 8157 68
DF0HQ 8025 67
PJ2T 7748 55
YT2W 7634 67
KC1XX 7141 57
LX7I 7119 62


CQ WW 2011:

Callsign Appearances % logs
C5A 11477 73
DR1A 10731 70
9A1A 10399 70
LZ9W 9739 67
CR3L 9509 68
PJ2T 9474 62
SK3W 9354 65
DF0HQ 9221 65
TK4W 8555 61
C6AAW 8534 57


CQ WW 2012:

Callsign Appearances % logs
D4C 14304 79
C5A 12357 73
HK1NA 11133 67
Z38N 10900 67
CR3L 10696 68
9A1A 10420 69
DR1A 10122 65
LZ9W 10090 67
PJ4A 8995 59
PJ2T 8773 57


CQ WW 2013:

Callsign Appearances % logs
D4C 15607 83
ES9C 12575 74
9A1A 11606 73
ED6A 11477 69
HK1NA 11264 68
PJ2T 11058 66
DR1A 10666 66
LZ9W 10250 67
CR3L 10103 67
IR9Y 9471 63


CQ WW 2014:

Callsign Appearances % logs
CN2AA 16754 83
9A1A 12234 73
LZ9W 11784 70
HK1NA 11660 68
9K2HN 11499 70
PJ2T 10433 63
EA5KA 10412 66
DR1A 10151 64
DF0HQ 10093 65
K3LR 9911 61


CQ WW 2015:

Callsign Appearances % logs
D4C 11129 68
9A1A 11047 72
LZ9W 10375 68
PJ2T 9498 58
CR3L 9456 63
CN2AA 8934 59
LX7I 8933 62
YT5A 8827 62
P33W 8764 60
DF0HQ 8537 61


We can also look at ten-year spans:


CQ WW 2005 to 2014:

Callsign Appearances % logs
LZ9W 81702 68
PJ2T 75453 59
DF0HQ 70559 60
DR1A 66706 55
K3LR 64391 54
W3LPL 63800 53
9A1A 62050 53
LX7I 61869 56
LY7A 61258 57
PJ4A 60797 52


CQ WW 2006 to 2015:

Callsign Appearances % logs
LZ9W 85748 67
DF0HQ 79095 64
PJ2T 78546 58
9A1A 73092 58
PJ4A 68977 56
W3LPL 68458 54
K3LR 68360 55
LX7I 67527 57
D4C 67448 48
DR1A 66737 52


Online Files Now Hosted By Adrive

I have been using copy.com to host the files I make available online. Unfortunately, that service is going to close in a few weeks' time.

So I have copied the files over to the Adrive hosting service.

The relevant files are to be found at the following new locations:
I am sorry for any inconvenience caused by this change.

The files will continue to be available at their original locations on copy.com until that service is closed.

2016-02-16

"Nowhere to Run" available in electronic formats





My Christian action novel (for want of a better description), Nowhere to Run, is now available in several electronic formats:
Don't ask me why Apple charges more than the price I set. They seem to do this with all my books.

Most of the above links also allow you to read a sample, typically 10 to 15 percent of the book.

This book was inspired by events in the life of a fellow member of the Rotary Club of Boulder (Colorado) and his wife.

You can, of course, still purchase a print version of the book.